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github.com Release v1.115.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

A week later than you’re accustomed to — but worth the wait! Pulsar 1.115.0 is available now! Last month’s 1.114.0 release was full of fixes related to the recent migration to modern Tree-sitter. T...

A week later than you’re accustomed to — but worth the wait! Pulsar 1.115.0 is available now!

Last month’s 1.114.0 release was full of fixes related to the recent migration to modern Tree-sitter. This month’s release is much smaller, but still dominated by Tree-sitter fixes affecting syntax highlighting, code folding, and indentation.

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do you use cotton leggings? would you recommend them?
  • Unfortunately it is relative. On reddit this probably wouldn't even be noticed, it would just likely be buried and never seen by the vast majority of people. Problem is people bring the same posting habits to Lemmy as they are used to on Reddit (opening lots of posts over multiple communities which is necessary in order to be seen) and it creates a lot of extra noise and perceived spam.

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    Need a list of FOSS alternatives
  • I think they mean "watch out" as in "keep an eye out for" rather than "be careful of".

    On a different note I love that you have Pulsar on there :), I'm one of the team working on it so its always nice to see it mentioned in places.

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    The Creators of the Atom Code Editor Open-Source Zed, Their New Rust-Based High-Performance Editor
  • On the plus side, the fact they stopped Atom development has allowed our community fork of Pulsar to flourish and it has seen loads of active development over the last year. I do find it hard to blame the original team, it was clearly a Microsoft thing to make sure they put all focus on VSCode.

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    What are some popular fermented sauces in your area?
  • When I was working in the Barnsley area I used to pick it up to bring it home to the south. The last time I was there I made sure to stock up on it, now you can just get it anywhere - they sell it in my local Sainsbury's and Waitrose now.

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    good luck little buddy, see you in 5 years
  • The technology is nothing alike though. Atom is Electron and Javascript where Zed is Rust with its own custom UI toolkit.

    And on the current version of Pulsar (the only real community fork of Atom seeing active development), startup time to point of the editor being usable is actually slightly faster than VSCode.

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    I hate github, tell me about cool projects and apps that is hosted on alternative platforms (Not mirrored).
  • Forgejo itself is hosted on Codeberg, dogfooding itself
    Foot terminal emulator
    Tenacity Audacity fork
    xmobar status bar written in (and configured in) Haskell
    Redox Unix-like OS written in Rust
    RISC OS Open the original ARM OS, still seeing active development

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    How did you lose weight?
  • Not a method I'd ever recommend to anybody but depression did it. Just stopped eating, like, almost entirely, had no appetite whatsoever, would force myself to eat at least something around dinner time, around 50g of carbs (when dry) like pasta, rice or noodles. Drank tea during the day for some caffeine. Combined with some exercise - started walking then running about 5k every few days.

    Things got a bit more normal after a while and just kind of went with watching calories. Mostly just kept an eye on carbs - no more than 100g per day, used less fat or oil in cooking, picked slightly (but not excessively) leaner cuts of meat, more veggie dishes, skimmed milk, no sugary drinks. Never was one for eating breakfast, my day would normally be some kind of lunch time thing like a couple of crumpets with some jam, an afternoon snack - usually rice cakes, japanese-style crackers, pickled stuff (gherkins, onions, sauerkraut) then dinner as I mentioned above. There was a few brands of ice cream that did low calorie versions I would buy for dessert, or I would have fat-free yoghurt and a couple of squares of chocolate.

    I found this pretty easy to do during covid (started this all maybe mid 2020). It was easy to hide the fact you were eating strangely if people aren't aware. The bit that I found (and still find) hardest is the intention to start or cut portion sizes. I never intended to do it but I found that when I stopped eating because I had no appetite, it was like a kind of reset that allowed me to build up to a more appropriate diet. I can't say I think this is a good idea for a whole host of reasons but that is what happened to me.

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  • github.com Release v1.114.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    A Valentine's release bursting with love, Pulsar 1.114.0 is available now! Welcome to a brand new Pulsar release! I think it is safe to say that this month has been one of our more eventful due to ...

    Welcome to a brand new Pulsar release!This release features a lot of updates and fixes for our modern Tree-sitter implementation, an assorted bag of bug fixes and some new features to introduce, such as restoring compatibility with older Linux distributions and a new ppm command.

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    [ADHDinos] Emotional Dysregulation
  • No but I do understand where they are coming from. Can I read it? Yes. Is it hard to read? No. However for me it is oddly... uncomfortable... to read. Thats the best way I can describe it. I normally scan read the text and the way I understand it is that when people read like this they are looking for the overall shapes of words, not the individual letters, which is why it is possible to misspell the middle letters of words without causing too much issue with comprehension. However for me the way the letters are 'weighted' in the font is like a visual speedbump, they draw attention to themselves in a way which, for me, is unwanted and causes me to slow and change how I read each word.

    I've noticed it before but I can't say I particularly care, it isn't like I'm reading prose. If this helps others then I think it is great that it is being used.

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    ditch discord!
  • The moment I see the same question popping up more than a couple of times is an indication that it should be documented by somewhere that is actually indexed by search engines, normally the website/faq/docs/wiki as it is clear there is something missing.

    To me, as part of a small team/project, it feels so much better to be able to use chat for every day communication just as I would at work. It allows a lot more expression in communication than forum posting. It has really helped us have a good sense of community and teamwork we might have not otherwise had.

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    ditch discord!
  • I don't think much in this is specific to Discord so much as it is to chat/IM in general. Honestly we use both chat (yes via Discord although I'd love to move to Matrix) and forums. They just serve completely different roles. Traditional style forums (whatever it is, Discourse, Flarum, Github Discussions) work really well for "long form" topics and asynchronous conversations. i.e. if there is something to discuss that is complex and can attract valid conversation over the course of days/weeks/months then it is ideal.

    Chat on the other hand is great for co-ordinating and asking quick one-off questions that will get you an answer really quickly. We use it all the time to just discuss general plans, ideas etc. and answer simple questions like "how do I do x?".

    I think most of the (justified) hatred is to those projects that only have a community via chat which is valid - on big projects it can be somewhat difficult to get a word in and get noticed if you have a "simple" question which wouldn't be a problem on a forum.

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    ditch discord!
  • I understand the mentality but depending on the project it can be a struggle. If I was going to set up a brand new software project then sure, I'd be going all in on Fediverse and open source platforms. Forge? Codeberg. Chat? Matrix. Forum? Discourse/Flarum or maybe just Lemmy. Microblog? Mastodon.

    However it isn't easy to be that idealistic all the time and sometimes there is a degree of needing to do stuff against your ideals. I'm part of the Pulsar editor team which is a fork of the Atom text editor that got discontinued and we had to get things moving as quickly as possible in the time period that GitHub set until they pulled their services completely (along with their package backend). We needed the least friction possible to get things in motion and get as many people from the community involved as possible.

    We needed GitHub - unsurprisingly Atom had close ties with GitHub anyway so moving away wasn't ever going to be quite that simple and we would have needed to migrate an awful lot of repos within the org. The entire Atom package system relies on GitHub - people published their packages to atom.io but the actual code was on GitHub - something not fixable in the short period we had. We also needed it because this is where the Atom community was gathered around - at a period where we needed things to be as simple as possible for people to find out about and get involved with the project, moving to another forge may have just been the end of it.

    We also use GitHub Discussions for our forum - as we are already tied to GitHub for the time being we might as well use that platform as well - it is a lot easier than trying to maintain our own forums which wouldn't be seeing that much activity. The team behind Zed found this out; they set up a Discourse forum and barely anyone used it so they just went back to GitHub Discussions.

    We needed Discord because it was simply the most commonly used platform. Pulsar split off from Atom-community which was already on Discord so it was a natural move that meant little disruption or friction to anyone wanting to get involved with the new project. We have been looking to make a Matrix bridge but honestly there doesn't seem to be all that much desire for it - we had some initial enthusiasm to create a Lemmy community but when we did it barely sees any activity (other than me posting updates there).

    Would I love to move off of these platforms? Absolutely. However we simply have bigger fish to fry at this point in time for the project itself so it is going to be slow.

    So whilst I love to be idealistic about what platforms we should be using I also heavily sympathise with those who use those "less than ideal" ones - there could well be some very good reasons behind it that might not be obvious to you.

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    Text editor with predefined text snippets?
  • Pulsar (i.e. active fork of Atom) has a pretty comprehensive snippets package that comes bundled with the editor. Can be configured with some fairly simple cson, for example with Markdown:

    '.source.gfm':
      'Hello Lemmy':
        'prefix': 'helem'
        'body': 'Hello Lemmy!'
    

    You type helem then press tab and it will expand to Hello Lemmy! when using the Markdown grammar (source.gfm).
    It can handle custom tab stops too so you can make a longer preformatted sentence with gaps to insert words which you can just tab through (the $1, $2, $3).

    '.source.gfm':
      'My custom snippet':
        'prefix': 'mcs'
        'body': 'My snippet stops here $1 and then here $2 and then continues $3'
    

    You can even do multi-line snippets. For anyone wanting to try it out the docs are here

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    Microsoft Says VS Code Will Work With Ubuntu 18.04
  • When MS killed Atom we forked it as Pulsar (https://pulsar-edit.dev/). It is under active development, entirely community-led and everything is as open and transparent as possible. We have downloads for various Linux distros (x86 and arm), macOS and Windows. Might be worth a look if that is the kind of editor you are interested in.

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    Seppo: Personal Social Web
  • UK too, particularly common in the forces.(For those unaware it is rhyming slang - seppo = septic tank = yank). Somtimes just "septics" too.

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  • pulsar-edit.dev Community Update |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    Last month was our biggest update to Pulsar we have had in quite a while, so in this blog we will be addressing some of the issues people have seen and what you can expect in terms of fixes and updates. Outside of that, we have some big changes to the Pulsar Package Registry backend that give (and document) a bunch of new filters and endpoints to the API, as well as a reminder for \@maurício szabo's blog post detailing our biggest hurdle: the road to modern versions of Electron.

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    Zed - A code editor written in rust by Atom's Developer.
  • None of those by default, Pulsar tends to stick to being an editor with as much as you need but not more by default. However one good thing about forking Atom was that we kept all the packages that were published to atom.io (more than 10k of them). You can browse them the PPR (Pulsar Package Registry) which was reverse engineered from Atom's closed source backend from scratch before they took down the site - https://web.pulsar-edit.dev/.

    Specifically there are a bunch of remote edit packages that work over SSH, a ton of Docker packages and there are plenty of debugging packages both generic and language specific and there are indeed test runner packages.

    I won't say I guarantee all of these will work but our Discord channel in particular is rather active so people more knowledgeable than I might well be able to help out, its a friendly place. We have other social channels as well should you prefer them.

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  • pulsar-edit.dev The quest for Electron LTS |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    In the beginning, Atom appeared. It created an API to make packages, but together with this API, it also allowed authors to use web APIs together with node.js packages, modules (including "native modules" - more on that later) and, finally, a special API that was used to communicate between the "main module" and the "browser part".

    That last part, eventually, split from Atom and became Electron. And for a while, the Atom development was tied to the Electron one, meaning that an update on Atom usually meant an update on Electron, and vice-versa.

    Unfortunately, that wasn't the case for a long time...

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    We’ve been telling a series of stories about all the different ways that Tree-sitter can improve the editing experience in Pulsar. Today’s story about symbols-view starts a bit slowly, but it’s got a great ending: the addition of a major new feature to Pulsar 1.113.

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    github.com Release v1.113.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    Unlucky for some, but not us. Our 13th release, Pulsar 1.113.0, is available now! Welcome to our first release of 2024! This is our 13th main release; let's just hope we aren't cursed by the number...

    Welcome to the release of Pulsar 1.113.0, our first release of 2024. For this release we have enabled our modern Tree-sitter implementation by default, a new Tree-sitter PHP grammar, a huge update to our 'symbols-view' package, a bunch of bug fixes and an issue where we banish 😡 to the Netherrealm.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Community Update |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    Welcome to our first community update of 2024! We have a reminder about our upcoming tree-sitter change, a resolution to our annoying website issues, a brand new PPR API endpoint so you can find packages by your favourite authors, a statement on our commitment to our long-term projects and a very special new year community spotlight.

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    github.com Release v1.112.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    Christmas has come early: Pulsar 1.112.0 is available now! Welcome to our 12th regular release! It has been exactly a year since we put out our first tagged release and development continues. This ...

    Welcome to our 12th regular release! It has been exactly a year since we put out our first tagged release and development continues. This month we have some new soft-wrapping options, some long overdue updates to PPM, improvements to our "GitHub" package, a new fuzzyMatcher API and our usual slew of bug fixes.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Community Update |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    This month we have a big update on our plans to move to a new version of electron and what that might mean for our releases, some better error handling on our package website and our usual community spotlight to say thank you to those community members contributing to Pulsar's development!

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    github.com Release v1.111.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    If you're API and you know it, clap your hands!: Pulsar 1.111.0 is available now! Welcome to a new Pulsar regular release. This time we have a big new addition to Pulsar's API along with our usual ...

    Welcome to a new Pulsar regular release!

    This time we have a brand new API, a reduction in Pulsar's installed size, a fix for a really tricky and annoying bug, and some fixes from the community.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Modern Tree-sitter, part 5: injections |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    One annoying thing that software developers do is insist on writing in more than one language at once. Web developers are espeically obnoxious about this — routinely, for instance, putting CSS inside their HTML, or HTML inside their JavaScript, or CSS inside their HTML inside their JavaScript.

    Code editors like Pulsar need to roll with this, so today we’ll talk about how the modern Tree-sitter system handles what we call injections.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Community Update |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    This month we have a couple of really significant changes to how Pulsar works internally by creating a couple of new APIs that can be used throughout the application, a new package to help you run code directly within Pulsar and our usual community spotlight to say thank you to those community members contributing to Pulsar's development!

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    Last time we looked at Tree-sitter’s query system and showed how it can be used to make a syntax highlighting engine in Pulsar. But syntax highlighting is simply the most visible of the various tasks that a language package performs.

    Today we’ll look at two other systems — indentation hinting and code folding — and I’ll explain how queries can be used to support each one.

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    github.com Release v1.110.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    Armed with a big ol' can of Raid: Pulsar 1.110.0 is available now! Here we are with another Pulsar release, and this month we have quite a number of fixes and improvements. This time around, the fo...

    Here we are with another Pulsar release, and this month we have quite a number of fixes and improvements. This time the focus has really been on bug fixes in order to improve the overall experience.

    We have updates to PPM for newer toolchain compatibility, a new Autocomplete API, better error handling for a crash at launch with invalid config and a fix for PHP snippets.

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    Last time I laid out the case for why we chose to embrace TextMate-style scope names, even in newer Tree-sitter grammars. I set a difficult challenge for Pulsar: make it so that a Tree-sitter grammar can do anything a TextMate grammar can do.

    Today, I'd like to show you the specific problems that we had to solve in order to pull that off.

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    https:// pulsar-edit.dev /blog/20231004-Daeraxa-OctoberUpdate.htm

    This month we announce our new "Pulsar Cooperative" initiative, showcase work being done to modernize the PPM codebase, introduce the new Shields.io badges for the Pulsar Package Repository, show off the new Pulsar integration in GitHub Desktop and talk about an issue we had with signing our macOS binaries.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Modern Tree-sitter, part 2: why scopes matter |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    In the last post, I tried to explain why the new Tree-sitter integration was worth writing about in the first place: because we needed to integrate it into a system defined by TextMate grammars, and we had to solve some challenging problems along the way.

    Today I’ll try to illustrate what that system looks like and why it’s important.

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    pulsar-edit.dev Modern Tree-sitter, part 1: the new old feature |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    The last few releases of Pulsar have been bragging about a feature that arguably isn’t even new: our experimental “modern” Tree-sitter implementation. You might’ve read that phrase a few times now without fully understanding what it means, and an explanation is long overdue.

    This is the first of a series of articles about Pulsar’s ongoing project to migrate its Tree-sitter implementation to a more modern version. Read this first installment now on the Pulsar Blog

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    github.com Release v1.109.0 · pulsar-edit/pulsar

    Going the whole nine yards: Get Pulsar 1.109.0 now! Our next release has arrived, and, as ever, we are excited to share all the changes we have been making over the last month since our last releas...

    Our next release has arrived, and we are excited to share all the changes we have been making over the last month. We have a smorgasbord of bug fixes and QoL improvements.

    We have completely overhauled our CI, converted the last of our CoffeeScript, removed the defunct "autoUpdate" API, improved our "about" package, squashed a bunch of bugs and even found ways to reduce our cloud costs!

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    pulsar-edit.dev Pulsar's CI |

    A Community-led Hyper-Hackable Text Editor

    A look into the significant ways that Pulsar's CI has recently changed. The why and how behind what happened.

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