Skip Navigation
'Mysterious' monolith appears in Las Vegas desert, baffling locals: 'We see a lot of weird things'
  • And I'm pretty sure that is the best explanation, I just want more details.

    The one I saw would have been difficult to install without any locals spotting it happen, which they didn't, so I am very impressed and would be curious to know how they did it.

  • bloody-disgusting.com Here's the Latest Update on A24's "Crystal Lake"; Charlize Theron as Pamela Voorhees?!

    A24 and Peacock's planned Friday the 13th television series "Crystal Lake" went up in smoke earlier this year, with showrunner Bryan Fuller ("Hannibal")

    Here's the Latest Update on A24's "Crystal Lake"; Charlize Theron as Pamela Voorhees?!

    > A24 and Peacock’s planned Friday the 13th television series “Crystal Lake” went up in smoke earlier this year, with showrunner Bryan Fuller (“Hannibal”) being fired from the project and leaving the fate of the small screen project unclear. So what really happened? The Wrap just dropped one hell of an exclusive report untangling the behind the scenes mess. > > To refresh your memory before we dive in, Peacock had given the project a straight-to-series order in 2022, with “Crystal Lake” being described as an “expanded prequel” to the original Friday the 13th franchise featuring both Jason Voorhees and his mother, Pamela. According to The Wrap’s new report, Charlize Theron was being “eyed” to play Mrs. Voorhees! > > Other new details from The Wrap’s report reveal that the episode written by Kevin Williamson (Scream) was going to take place “entirely on a frozen Crystal Lake,” with Williamson recently describing the episode as “an hour-long chase.” Friday the 13th fans have been begging for a Winter-set Friday installment for many years now, and A24 was set to deliver just that. > > Additionally, Vincenzo Natali (Cube, Splice) and Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry, Carrie) were set to direct episodes, with the budget ballooning to around $10 million per episode. With eight episodes in total planned for the first season, it would’ve cost A24 roughly $85 million to bring the series to life, with additional seasons being planned by the studio. > > The Wrap’s report notes, “In the grand ambition of Crystal Lake, each season would be a “deconstruction” of the first four Paramount movies. The series would incorporate lore from several sequels but remix that material in a way similar to Fuller’s Hannibal.” > > Vincenzo Natali had recently tweeted, “I have read the first two episodes. Bryan Fuller’s Crystal Lake was well on its way to becoming another Hannibal-level reinvention that was simultaneously beautiful, sad, poetic, funny and horrifying. I mourn its passing.” > > So what happened? According to The Wrap, Bryan Fuller was fired from “Crystal Lake” just three months before production was set to begin this summer. The Wrap notes, “Crystal Lake was plagued by inexperienced production executives making questionable decisions, problems with the show’s writing staff and conflicts between showrunners and executives.”

    0
    'Mysterious' monolith appears in Las Vegas desert, baffling locals: 'We see a lot of weird things'
  • Sounds like it is clear who is behind it, unless there is some reason to not believe them.

    Anyone can claim they did it but I am unsure they've provided proof. A NM art collective might explain the more local occurrences but they've been found across in the UK and across Europe, which sounds like international pranksters were at work.

  • 'Mysterious' monolith appears in Las Vegas desert, baffling locals: 'We see a lot of weird things'
  • I might be misremembering, but wasn’t this happening elsewhere like, 2 or 3 years ago, and it was just an art thing someone was doing?

    The end of the quote from the article does go into that and it isn't comprehensive as I went to see one near me during lockdown.

  • 2000AD annual returns, new new Treasury of British Comics Annual announced

    downthetubes.net 2000AD annual returns, new new Treasury of British Comics Annual announced

    The first 2000AD Annual of the 21st Century arrives in November

    2000AD annual returns, new new Treasury of British Comics Annual announced

    > After an absence of three decades, the first 2000AD Annual of the 21st Century arrives in November – in plenty of time to make it under the tree – from all good comic book shops, as well as the 2000AD webshop. > > This gorgeous hardcover collection will feature a mix of brand new and classic stories from top creators – including John Wagner (A History of Violence), Alan Grant (Batman), Simon Spurrier (Hellblazer, Coda), Dan Abnett (Warhammer 40k), Phil Winslade (Lawless), Fernando Blanco (Detective Comics), Ian Gibson (Halo Jones), Dave Gibbons (Watchmen), Mick McMahon (The Last American), and Emma Vieceli (Life Is Strange). > > It will come in two editions with stunning new covers bringing a fresh twist to the annuals of yesteryear – the standard edition will feature a bold, contemporary ensemble of 2000AD’s greatest heroes by breakout Judge Dredd and Rok of the Reds artist Jake Lynch (Judge Dredd), while the 2000AD webshop-exclusive edition will have a special retro cover by the legendary Brian Bolland (Batman: The Killing Joke), drawing his first 2000 AD annual cover since 1983! > > And, due to popular demand, the 2000AD Annual will be joined by a brand new Treasury of British Comics Annual! > > Last year’s sold out hardcover returns this November with three brand new stories from industry superstars, including Simon Furman (Transformers) and Mike Collins (Doctor Who) on Kelly’s Eye, Alec Worley (Hook-Jaw) and Anna Morozova (Lowborn High) on Black Beth, and Paul Grist (Jack Staff) and Simon Williams (The HOFF: Heroes of Fearless Freedom) on Robot Archie. > > Rebellion has delved in its vast archive to craft a selection of some of the greatest strips ever to appear in British comics – including Adam Eterno, Cursitor Doom, Stryker, and Major Eazy from such esteemed titles as, Scream!, Battle, Tiger, Valiant and Lion!

    1
    The Life Of A Collector Is Always Intense - Criterion Announces September 2024 4K UHD & Blu-rays
  • They have extra intense lives as there is no time to upgrade to a Blu-ray player or shop around for fancy discs, they get in, grab the film they want and get out again.

  • The Life Of A Collector Is Always Intense - Criterion Announces September 2024 4K UHD & Blu-rays

    > As physical media collectors well know, The Criterion Collection can be rather eclectic with their selections. Sometimes you get your true Hollywood classic. Sometimes you get a great piece of French of Japanese cinema. Occasionally you get one hell of an incredible box set. But every once in a while they stack their slate with a smorgasbord of cult classics, fan favorites, and one of the best gangster flicks to come out of England (and there are a lot of those!). So lets get into it -

    • Repo Man 4k
    • All of Us Strangers 4k
    • The Long Good Friday 4k
    • Gregg Araki's Teen Apocalypse Trilogy 4K
    • Happiness 4k

    Tech specs at Blu-ray.com

    2

    'Mysterious' monolith appears in Las Vegas desert, baffling locals: 'We see a lot of weird things'

    www.foxnews.com 'Mysterious' Las Vegas monolith appears in desert

    Las Vegas police say a "mysterious monolith" similar to other ones discovered around the world has appeared in a desert north of the Nevada city.

    'Mysterious' Las Vegas monolith appears in desert

    cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/13504108

    > > A "mysterious monolith" has appeared in a desert north of Las Vegas. > > > > The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department says the shiny, reflective structure – similar to one found in Utah years ago – was spotted by its search and rescue unit near Gass Peak over the weekend. > > > > "We see a lot of weird things when people go hiking like not being prepared for the weather, not bringing enough water... but check this out!" police wrote on X alongside an image of the monolith. > > > > The discovery comes months after a hiker in Wales captured a video of a mysterious "UFO"-like monolith on top of a hillside along the country’s border with England. > > > > ... > > > > Similar monoliths also have been found in Belgium, Romania and the Isle of Wight – an island in the English Channel. > > > > In November 2020, one of the monoliths, estimated at between 10 feet and 12 feet high, was found by Utah state wildlife employees who were counting sheep from a helicopter. > > > > ... > > > > Then a week later, another monolith was discovered in Atascadero, California, which is north of Los Angeles. > > > > It’s unclear who is behind the placement of the monoliths. A New Mexico artist collective claimed responsibility years ago. > > Archive link > > Previously: monolith in Powys

    0

    'Mysterious' monolith appears in Las Vegas desert, baffling locals: 'We see a lot of weird things'

    www.foxnews.com 'Mysterious' Las Vegas monolith appears in desert

    Las Vegas police say a "mysterious monolith" similar to other ones discovered around the world has appeared in a desert north of the Nevada city.

    > A "mysterious monolith" has appeared in a desert north of Las Vegas. > > The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department says the shiny, reflective structure – similar to one found in Utah years ago – was spotted by its search and rescue unit near Gass Peak over the weekend. > > "We see a lot of weird things when people go hiking like not being prepared for the weather, not bringing enough water... but check this out!" police wrote on X alongside an image of the monolith. > > The discovery comes months after a hiker in Wales captured a video of a mysterious "UFO"-like monolith on top of a hillside along the country’s border with England. > > ... > > Similar monoliths also have been found in Belgium, Romania and the Isle of Wight – an island in the English Channel. > > In November 2020, one of the monoliths, estimated at between 10 feet and 12 feet high, was found by Utah state wildlife employees who were counting sheep from a helicopter. > > ... > > Then a week later, another monolith was discovered in Atascadero, California, which is north of Los Angeles. > > It’s unclear who is behind the placement of the monoliths. A New Mexico artist collective claimed responsibility years ago.

    Archive link

    Previously: monolith in Powys

    12
    Lethal Weapon 5 | Mel Gibson confirms he's directing
  • He's been back for a while, I don't think he even bothered with any redemption shenanigans, just waited it out.

  • Tattoos gave Marco Pierre White’s son away when his trousers fell during burglary
  • I did worry as I scrolled down, half expecting to see the offending tattoos.

  • World Naked Bike Ride returns to Madison despite controversy
  • Weird - it didn't do that to me earlier. I used to run across quite a few like that because they didn't want to abide by EU laws, but it hasn't been so bad recently.

  • The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare skips UK cinemas, sets July streaming date
  • That's a pity, I would have given that a spin in the cinema.

  • British Films @feddit.uk ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝 @feddit.uk

    Daisy Ridley's 'STAR WARS: EPISODE X - A NEW BEGINNING' will begin filming from September 2nd, 2024 in London, UK.

    productionlist.com Star Wars: Episode X - A New Beginning - Production List | Film & Television Industry Alliance

    Star Wars: A New Beginning is the official sequel to the Skywalker saga. The plot is expected to be about Rey rebuilding the Jedi Order after the events of The Rise of Skywalker. The film will be directed by Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, who also directed episodes 4 and 5 of ‘Ms. Marvel’. Daisy Ridley is s...

    0
    British Films @feddit.uk ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝 @feddit.uk

    'FANTASTIC FOUR' will start shooting from August 2nd, 2024 in London, UK

    productionlist.com Fantastic Four - Production List | Film & Television Industry Alliance

    Reed Richards, Ben Grimm, Susan Storm, and her brother, Johnny Storm, were forever changed during an experimental space flight that exposed them to cosmic rays, which gave them super human powers and abilities. Mister Fantastic, Invisible Woman, Human Torch, and the Thing utilize their scientific ba...

    0
    [Meta] Do you have ideas for a new icon and banner?
  • Both great ideas.

    For the icon, if we could get a film reel and make it a transparent gif then it'd fit nicely with the UI.

  • DÌDI (弟弟) - Official Trailer [HD] - Only In Theaters July 26
  • It's getting a lot of great reviews and rewards buzz - I try and see as many Oscar contenders as possible, so I've put this in my list.

  • Zhang Yimou to Direct ‘Three-Body Problem’ Movie
  • That'll be interesting - a friend just lent me the first book, so I'm looking forward to seeing how the various adaptations stack up.

  • www.independent.co.uk Tattoos gave Marco Pierre White’s son away when his trousers fell during burglary

    Marco Pierre White Jr accidentally mooned his bare backside at the cafe’s CCTV cameras

    Tattoos gave Marco Pierre White’s son away when his trousers fell during burglary

    > The troubled son of famed chef Marco Pierre White been jailed for robbing a Grade II-listed cafe after he was identified by the distinctive tattoos on his legs while escaping from a window. > > Marco Pierre White Jr is serving a 41-week prison sentence after being caught smashing into a Bath delicatessen with a champagne bottle and stealing £250 in May. > > The 29-year-old was identified by authorities after his trousers fell down revealing his distinctive tattoos on his legs. > > ... > > “He probably thought he was in the clear but when he crawled back through the window he got his tracksuit caught on the frame and accidentally mooned his bare backside right at our CCTV cameras.” > > He added: “He’s been hanging out with the wrong crowd for years and we know he’s got a drug problem. > > “This is the second time he’s broken into our cafe – the first time was almost exactly a year ago when he stole about £650. > > “The hilarious thing about this burglary is that we only knew it was him because his trousers got caught around his ankles and we could see his tattoos on his bum cheeks.”

    13
    Historic writer's desk could be 'knackered' old fake
  • Perhaps you could help establish the desk's authenticity, under the scientific principle that it takes one to know one.

  • Farage says he's aiming to be credible candidate to take over as PM at next general election

    www.theguardian.com Reform UK plans ‘don’t add up’ and costings are out ‘by tens of billions of pounds per year’, says IFS – as it happened

    As Nigel Farage launches party’s manifesto, Institute for Fiscal Studies says ‘the package as a whole is problematic’

    Reform UK plans ‘don’t add up’ and costings are out ‘by tens of billions of pounds per year’, says IFS – as it happened

    > In his Today interview Nigel Farage, the Reform UK leader, restated his ambition to take over as leader of the opposition to Labour in the next parliament. He said that by the time of the next election he wanted to be the person most likely to replace Keir Starmer as PM. > > He told the programme: > >> This is our first big election as a party. Our plan is to establish that bridgehead in parliament and to use that voice to build a big, national campaigning movement around the country over the course of the next five years for genuine change. > > Asked by Justin Webb if that meant Farage was aiming to be a credible candidate for PM in 2029, Farage replied: > >> Yes, absolutely. >> >> I think the disconnect between the Labour and conservative Westminster-based parties and the country, the thoughts, hopes and aspirations of ordinary people, are so far apart from where our politics is. And the funny thing is they show no signs of changing. >> >> I was in those seven-way debates, one on the BBC, one on ITV, and the more that Angela Rayner argued with Penny Mordaunt, the more they sounded the same. There are no real, fundamental differences between these two parties. > > Farage also said that, when he decided to stand as a candidate and to take over as Reform UK leader, he was making a “minimum five-year commitment” to build this movement. > > Asked if he was committed to leading “a centre-right coalition” taking on Labour at the time of the next election, Farage replied: ‘That’s absolutely right. That’s our ambition and we believe it is achievable.” > > Many commentators would query whether any movement led by Farage would be described as “centre-right”. For reasons explained here, the terms radical right or far right might be more accurate. > > Some Tories would like see Farage playing this role as Conservative party leader (assuming he would be allowed to join). Some of his Reform UK colleagues just want to replace the Conservative party. Farage himself has suggested the two parties could merge in what he has called a reverse takeover. In the Today interview he was not asked about the exact mechanism by which he envisaged leading a rightwing opposition in five years’ time.

    13
    www.independent.co.uk Labour in position to stop Farage becoming an MP, campaign group confirms

    Clacton gave Tory MP Giles Watling a huge majority of 24,702 in 2019 – now it may be a straight race between Labour’s Jovan Owusu-Nepaul and Nigel Farage

    Labour in position to stop Farage becoming an MP, campaign group confirms

    > Anti-Brexit group Best for Britain says its analysis confirms that Labour is in a strong position to win Clacton and stop Nigel Farage becoming an MP. > > The claim came as part of a wider tactical voting analysis by the group published this morning for 451 seats across the UK including a plan to unseat prime minister Rishi Sunak, his chancellor Jeremy Hunt and predecessor Liz Truss. > > ... > > Best for Britain’s chief executive Naomi Smith said that her group hoped to provide a roadmap for the four in 10 voters looking at voting tactically for centre left parties and wanted to minimise the number of Tory seats and prevent “nativist, populist parties” like Farage’s Reform UK getting a foothold in parliament. > > She said that previous votes in the area showed that there had been strong Labour support in Harwich, part of the Clacton seat, which “was suppressed by Brexit”. But Harwich had been held by Labour in 1997 and 2001. > > ... > > She said: “Our analysis shows that if the Greens and Lib Dems vote Labour then Labour can come through the middle and win Clacton.” > > It comes after Labour claimed the collapse in Tory support is now so bad that only they can stop Nigel Farage winning Clacton if the last remaining Conservatives vote tactically for their candidate. > > In 2019 Tory MP and former actor Giles Watling won Clacton with 72.3 per cent of the vote and a majority of 24,702, with Labour a very distant third on just 15.5 per cent. > > But with the arrival of Mr Farage as the Reform UK candidate in a seat twice won by his former party Ukip, the dynamics appear to have changed. > > Based on local projections from Electoral Calculus, Mr Farage is now the frontrunner with 39 per cent of the vote, ahead of Labour in a surprise second place with 27.6 per cent, and the Tories in third on 25.3 per cent. > > The poll led Clacton Labour to post on social media: “Latest Electoral Calculus polls for Clacton show that Jovan [Owusu-Nepaul] is the ONLY vote to stop Farage and bring CHANGE to Clacton!” > > ... > > However, localised polling based on national projections is notoriously inaccurate and leading pollster Lord Robert Hayward has warned against using Electoral Calculus as an accurate tool for predictions.

    2
    theconversation.com Searching for a female partner for the world’s ‘loneliest’ plant

    The plant has been propagated worldwide, but every surviving specimen of Encephalartos woodii is a male clone – and without a female, natural reproduction is impossible.

    > “Surely this is the most solitary organism in the world,” wrote palaeontologist Richard Fortey in his book about the evolution of life. > > He was talking about Encephalartos woodii (E. woodii), a plant from South Africa. E. woodii is a member of the cycad family, heavy plants with thick trunks and large stiff leaves that form a majestic crown. These resilient survivors have outlasted dinosaurs and multiple mass extinctions. Once widespread, they are today one of the most threatened species on the planet. > > The only known wild E. Woodii was discovered in 1895 by the botanist John Medley Wood while he was on a botanical expedition in the Ngoye Forest in South Africa. He searched the vicinity for others, but none could be found. Over the next couple of decades, botanists removed stems and offshoots and cultivated them in gardens > > Fearing that the final stem would be destroyed, the Forestry Department removed it from the wild in 1916 for safekeeping in a protective enclosure in Pretoria, South Africa, making it extinct in the wild. The plant has since been propagated worldwide. However, the E. woodii faces an existential crisis. All the plants are clones from the Ngoye specimen. They are all males, and without a female, natural reproduction is impossible. E. woodii’s story is one of both survival and solitude. > > My team’s research was inspired by the dilemma of the lonely plant and the possibility that a female may still be out there. Our research involves using remote sensing technologies and artificial intelligence to assist in our search for a female in the Ngoye Forest.

    3
    www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk Man who feared for his life after seeing big cat in Peak District was ‘possibly warned by black leopard’ - says expert

    We spoke to a big cat expert after a man claimed that he ‘feared for his life’ after a close encounter with a big cat in the Peak District.

    Man who feared for his life after seeing big cat in Peak District was ‘possibly warned by black leopard’ - says expert

    > Earlier this week media across the country have reported a story of John Broomhead, 68, who spoke about a scary incident that happened to him when he was camping near Tansley in July 2022. > > It has been reported that after a barbecue with friends, John went to put out the fire when he heard what he described as a ‘rustling noise’. He said that soon after he saw a ‘huge black shadow ’ which was three or four times bigger than a regular cat. > > John said that he could see the 'bright yellow eyes’ of the creature coming towards him. It has been reported that John ‘threw himself into the caravan’ after the animal moved from 40 yards away to 20 yards from the man in ‘an instant’. John said that he ‘feared he could get killed’ and that the incident left him traumatised. > > Rick Minter, the host of the Big Cat Conversations podcast and author of Big Cats Facing Britain’s Wild Predators spoke to the Derbyshire Times to discuss the incident. > > Rick said: “I hope to be able to speak to John in person about this case, but from his reported comments it would seem he witnessed a black leopard, also called a black panther. > > “In their native lands, leopards can do a warning charge when provoked or threatened. This is possibly what John experienced. Leopards attack by surging low to the ground at blistering speed, so from what he described it is much more likely to have been a charge to warn-off John. > > “Black leopards are the main big cats described by people across Britain. When mated together two black adult leopards breed 100% black offspring. There are now a few DNA results to back up the UK witness reports.

    0
    What's the deal with gbnews?
  • From February:

    GB News has paid Conservative MPs more than £660,000 in appearance fees and salaries since it launched, against just £1,100 to Labour MPs, Guardian analysis shows.

  • What's the deal with gbnews?
  • It's basically the UK's Fox News but perhaps even less impartial as it let's politicians host shows - it definitely feels like an attempt to shift the Overton Window to the right. Quite why it hasn't been sanctioned by Ofcom is unclear.

    There's a good overview here.

    edit: this is the key part for me:

    Around this time, the charity Hope not Hate published an investigation reporting that Paul Marshall, the founder of news and commentary website UnHerd and co-owner of what it called the “right-wing channel GB News”, had used his X account in a way that suggests “he holds a deeply disturbing view of modern Britain.”

    The holding company that owns GB News is called All Perspectives Ltd. It has two major shareholders: Legatum Ltd and Sir Paul, who own 41.2 per cent of the company each. Marshall’s fortune is put at an estimated £800m from his career as a hedge fund manager. He does not post on X much. He does, however, retweet and “like” what Hope not Hate described as “notorious hate accounts such as the Britain First deputy leader Ashlea Simon, American anti-Muslim campaigner Amy Mek and the shady Italian anti-migration account Radio Genoa.”

    Marshall, who is also bidding for ownership of the Telegraph and the Spectator, “has repeatedly liked and retweeted extremist content from an array of far-right and conspiracy theorist accounts,” the charity found. A representative for Marshall issued a statement noting that “as most X/Twitter users know, it can be a fountain of ideas, but some of it is of uncertain quality and all his posts have now been deleted to avoid any further misunderstanding.” What was “misunderstood” was not explained, but if the head honcho likes and retweets views like this, then the cast of eccentrics and Looney Tunes characters given airtime on his channel begins to make more sense.

    Here is the Hope Not Hate article that draws from.

  • gamerant.com Star Wars Fans Seem to Be Review-Bombing the Wrong 'Acolyte'

    Some Star Wars fans appear to be review bombing a movie that is completely unrelated to controversial Acolyte TV series.

    Star Wars Fans Seem to Be Review-Bombing the Wrong 'Acolyte'

    cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/13458510

    > > It seems some Star Wars fans are accidentally review bombing the 2008 Australian horror film Acolytes instead of The Acolyte Disney+ series. The Acolyte is the latest live-action Star Wars series to air on Disney+, premiering its first two episodes on June 4, with new episodes airing weekly until the finale on July 16. The show has earned mostly positive reviews from critics so far, but it has been incredibly divisive among Star Wars fans, to say the least. > > > > At the time of this writing, the Rotten Tomatoes critic score for The Acolyte is a respectable 84%, while its audience score is an abysmal 16%. Without delving into spoilers, there are Star Wars fans who are not happy about some of the creative choices in the show, feeling as though it doesn't fit with the rest of the Star Wars canon. Others are not impressed with the show's quality, and are unhappy at the direction the Star Wars franchise has been going in general. There are also some people who are upset that the show focuses on female characters and has a diverse cast. > > > > Those unhappy with The Acolyte, whether it's due to legitimate criticism about the show's quality or anger over its "woke" content, have taken to Rotten Tomatoes to let their displeasure be known, spamming the series with low ratings to bring down its audience score. However, some individuals seem to have gotten lost, instead review bombing the 2008 Australian horror film Acolytes, which has nothing to do with the Star Wars franchise in any capacity. Now, the Acolytes film was never popular with audiences anyway; from what we can see using the Way Back Machine, it's gone from about a 42% audience score to a 33% audience score. Still, it does seem as though its score has been impacted by Star Wars fans who actually want to review bomb The Acolyte instead.

    0
    Historic writer's desk could be 'knackered' old fake
  • It actually says Skribent under it and there's a crudely-drawn set of instructional diagrams carved into the wood.

  • World Naked Bike Ride returns to Madison despite controversy
  • It's an interesting one - I arrive at a news story like this ready to make saddle bag and bicycle seat jokes and am left contemplating Original Sin.

    Kids get naked and run round on the beach and elsewhere - should we make them feel shame for it? My cousin's grandson gets naked at the drop of a hat, which is a bit of a surprise the first few times but, after that, you just roll with it. Now if my cousin started doing that, then we might worry about her.

  • www.theguardian.com ‘We’re excited’: arthouse hits draw young UK filmgoers to a summer of subtitles

    A hiccup in the Hollywood studio machine has allowed indie films to flourish – and, crucially for cinemas, find a new generation of customers

    ‘We’re excited’: arthouse hits draw young UK filmgoers to a summer of subtitles

    cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/13440398

    > > This time last summer, British cinemas were holding their collective breath, looking forward to the biggest box office weekend of the year. “Barbenheimer” came to the rescue, with the doubleheader of blockbusters jointly chalking up an initial total of £30m when released in mid-July. > > > > This summer is a different story. There may be no lucrative Barbie or Oppenheimer at hand, but the holiday months at the cinema look potentially more interesting, if not downright weird – at least when it comes to Sasquatch Sunset, this weekend’s new, grunting, wordless tale of mythical Bigfoot folk, starring Jesse Eisenberg and Elvis Presley’s granddaughter Riley Keough. > > > > As the impact of last year’s Hollywood talent strikes combines with streaming habits formed during Covid lockdowns, a window of opportunity has been created for film-makers’ wilder imaginings; for smaller-scale, arthouse fare. The franchise machine has slowed down and more original, risky features have slipped in. “I feel quite positive about the moment we’re in,” said Isabel Stevens, managing editor of the film magazine Sight and Sound, “although I do appreciate it’s still a very difficult for cinemas.” > > > > So far, 2024 has seen a box office slump, but is being brightened by breakthrough independent productions that dodge commercial templates and are often in foreign languages (that aren’t Sasquatch). Prominent among them is Italian film La Chimera starring British actor Josh O’Connor. Out for over a month now, it is still drawing audiences and has taken over £700,000 at the British and Irish box office. Director Alice Rohrwacher’s film is pulling off a trick that big-budget title The Fall Guy could not manage: it has become a hit beyond its own ambitions. It must also be quite a surprise to Rohrwacher herself, since her last film, Happy as Lazzaro, brought in just a fifth of that. > > > > ... > > > > Phil Clapp, head of the UK Cinema Association, recently told Screen International that a “slightly thinner slate of the familiar franchises” had created an intriguing opportunity. “Stories that are something the audience hasn’t seen before, and makes them want to go back to the cinema, are vital for us,” he said. > > > > In the relatively quiet period before the next action juggernauts trundle in, British cinephiles can celebrate the joys of a film such as Wim Wenders’s Perfect Days, the tale of a Tokyo toilet cleaner that has taken more than £1.3m in receipts. Or The Taste of Things, a quiet, kitchen-based French love story with Juliette Binoche, which took just under £700,000. And now there is the sentimental appeal of There’s Still Tomorrow, a black-and-white melo­drama that trounced Barbie at the box office in its native Italy and is distributed here by Vue Cinemas. It has taken more than £300,000. > > > > ... > > > > An early sign of a fresh thirst for originality came with the foreign-language hits of the latest award season, Anatomy of a Fall and The Zone of Interest, the latter made in German by British director Jonathan Glazer. > > > > Charles Gant, box office editor at Screen International, points out that these apparently niche films are attracting a wide audience. Glazer’s film took £3.4m – a healthy figure in comparison with his 2013 cult horror film Under the Skin, despite that film’s A-list star, Scarlett Johansson. “When I watched the premiere of Zone of Interest in Cannes, I thought it was going to be a hard sell, but it went on to take quite a lot of money,” he said. “And you really have to see it in the cinema.” > > > > ... > > > > Still more heartening for Britain is the success of the homegrown films Aftersun, How to Have Sex, Rye Lane and All of Us Strangers, especially in the face of reports that UK independent production has been falling off a cliff. Only in February, Mike Goodridge, producer of the recent Palme d’Or-winning satire Triangle of Sadness, told BBC’s Today programme that it was “essentially on its knees”, with skilled actors and crews all working for big American companies. > > > > Since then, the impact of enhanced tax reliefs for British productions has been felt. That is a measure that might encourage the kind of shake-up spelled out for the Oscar crowd in March by the award-winning screenwriter Cord Jefferson, when he pointedly called on film backers to think smaller. “Instead of making one $200m movie, try making 20 $10m movies. Or 50 $4m movies,” he urged. > > > > As far as Gant can tell, there is no big shift in Hollywood as yet, where franchises still rule the roost. “But studios do now understand they need a mix. Just look at a surprise, smaller-scale hit like the romcom Anyone But You, which has cut through.”

    1
    British Films @feddit.uk ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝 @feddit.uk
    www.theguardian.com ‘We’re excited’: arthouse hits draw young UK filmgoers to a summer of subtitles

    A hiccup in the Hollywood studio machine has allowed indie films to flourish – and, crucially for cinemas, find a new generation of customers

    ‘We’re excited’: arthouse hits draw young UK filmgoers to a summer of subtitles

    > This time last summer, British cinemas were holding their collective breath, looking forward to the biggest box office weekend of the year. “Barbenheimer” came to the rescue, with the doubleheader of blockbusters jointly chalking up an initial total of £30m when released in mid-July. > > This summer is a different story. There may be no lucrative Barbie or Oppenheimer at hand, but the holiday months at the cinema look potentially more interesting, if not downright weird – at least when it comes to Sasquatch Sunset, this weekend’s new, grunting, wordless tale of mythical Bigfoot folk, starring Jesse Eisenberg and Elvis Presley’s granddaughter Riley Keough. > > As the impact of last year’s Hollywood talent strikes combines with streaming habits formed during Covid lockdowns, a window of opportunity has been created for film-makers’ wilder imaginings; for smaller-scale, arthouse fare. The franchise machine has slowed down and more original, risky features have slipped in. “I feel quite positive about the moment we’re in,” said Isabel Stevens, managing editor of the film magazine Sight and Sound, “although I do appreciate it’s still a very difficult for cinemas.” > > So far, 2024 has seen a box office slump, but is being brightened by breakthrough independent productions that dodge commercial templates and are often in foreign languages (that aren’t Sasquatch). Prominent among them is Italian film La Chimera starring British actor Josh O’Connor. Out for over a month now, it is still drawing audiences and has taken over £700,000 at the British and Irish box office. Director Alice Rohrwacher’s film is pulling off a trick that big-budget title The Fall Guy could not manage: it has become a hit beyond its own ambitions. It must also be quite a surprise to Rohrwacher herself, since her last film, Happy as Lazzaro, brought in just a fifth of that. > > ... > > Phil Clapp, head of the UK Cinema Association, recently told Screen International that a “slightly thinner slate of the familiar franchises” had created an intriguing opportunity. “Stories that are something the audience hasn’t seen before, and makes them want to go back to the cinema, are vital for us,” he said. > > In the relatively quiet period before the next action juggernauts trundle in, British cinephiles can celebrate the joys of a film such as Wim Wenders’s Perfect Days, the tale of a Tokyo toilet cleaner that has taken more than £1.3m in receipts. Or The Taste of Things, a quiet, kitchen-based French love story with Juliette Binoche, which took just under £700,000. And now there is the sentimental appeal of There’s Still Tomorrow, a black-and-white melo­drama that trounced Barbie at the box office in its native Italy and is distributed here by Vue Cinemas. It has taken more than £300,000. > > ... > > An early sign of a fresh thirst for originality came with the foreign-language hits of the latest award season, Anatomy of a Fall and The Zone of Interest, the latter made in German by British director Jonathan Glazer. > > Charles Gant, box office editor at Screen International, points out that these apparently niche films are attracting a wide audience. Glazer’s film took £3.4m – a healthy figure in comparison with his 2013 cult horror film Under the Skin, despite that film’s A-list star, Scarlett Johansson. “When I watched the premiere of Zone of Interest in Cannes, I thought it was going to be a hard sell, but it went on to take quite a lot of money,” he said. “And you really have to see it in the cinema.” > > ... > > Still more heartening for Britain is the success of the homegrown films Aftersun, How to Have Sex, Rye Lane and All of Us Strangers, especially in the face of reports that UK independent production has been falling off a cliff. Only in February, Mike Goodridge, producer of the recent Palme d’Or-winning satire Triangle of Sadness, told BBC’s Today programme that it was “essentially on its knees”, with skilled actors and crews all working for big American companies. > > Since then, the impact of enhanced tax reliefs for British productions has been felt. That is a measure that might encourage the kind of shake-up spelled out for the Oscar crowd in March by the award-winning screenwriter Cord Jefferson, when he pointedly called on film backers to think smaller. “Instead of making one $200m movie, try making 20 $10m movies. Or 50 $4m movies,” he urged. > > As far as Gant can tell, there is no big shift in Hollywood as yet, where franchises still rule the roost. “But studios do now understand they need a mix. Just look at a surprise, smaller-scale hit like the romcom Anyone But You, which has cut through.”

    0
    www.channel3000.com World Naked Bike Ride returns to Madison despite controversy

    MADISON, Wis. -- More than 100 nude bikers took to the streets of downtown Madison Saturday morning for the annual World Naked Bike Ride.

    World Naked Bike Ride returns to Madison despite controversy

    cross-posted from: https://real.lemmy.fan/post/4305310

    > MADISON, Wis. -- More than 100 nude bikers took to the streets of downtown Madison Saturday morning for the annual World Naked Bike Ride. > > "I think there's a sense of defiance, you know," said long-time participant Nicholas Wootten. "We wanted to really make a statement that we're back." > > Last year, the ride was thrown into controversy after a 10-year-old girl participated nude. The Wisconsin State Legislature took up bills aimed at stopping the event, but after they died at the end of the last legislative session, the ride is back in full swing. > > Dane County Supervisor Jeff Weigand was one of the first to raise concerns after the child participated last year. He says he believes the laws currently on the books should already prevent events like this. > > "There has been enforcement of the state statutes in the past, however different leadership comes in and then they tell police departments not to take action," Weigand said. "As a father of five and a former Dane County foster parent, I can especially tell you that children should not be permitted to take part or witness this type of event. The innocence of children is special, and as adults, we need to protect that innocence. The participants are actually taking away my freedoms because I can't bring my kids downtown Madison anymore, and if I do, I have to be very, very careful." > > The Dane County District Attorney and the Madison Police Department both declined to take action after the child took part saying the laws Weigand is referring to did not apply in this case. > > ... > > There are many reasons why people choose to ride nude with hundreds of others. Some participate in protest of oil usage, others to promote body positivity. Buchweitz says part of it for him is about biker safety.

    10
    www.gamespot.com Movie Trailers Are Killing Movies

    Generic, empty trailers for movies like The Fall Guy and Furiosa have started the summer off badly.

    Movie Trailers Are Killing Movies

    > A great movie trailer can single handedly turn a movie into a success story--like that genius Cloverfield trailer in 2007 that didn't say what the title of the movie was. But it's more common these days, I'd argue, for a trailer to have the opposite impact. A generic trailer can so thoroughly dampen hype for a film that something like Furiosa, a great movie everybody likes that's a sequel to a great movie everybody likes, could become a major box office disappointment. > > Furiosa was the second big financial letdown in May after The Fall Guy kicked the month off with a similarly low-key box office take, and both will end up coming in well below the numbers that summer blockbusters are supposed to have--neither of these films will get to the $100 million mark at the domestic box office. There are a lot of factors playing a part in why the summer has been so dismal thus far, but this my favorite: the trailers for those movies were awful. > > In technical terms, the ads for The Fall Guy and Furiosa are fine. They're slickly edited, and they played up the cool action that those films have and all that. But they lacked something that's just as important as big explosions for potential audiences: information. The Fall Guy was marketed on being a movie that Ryan Gosling does action scenes in--but if you wanted to actually know what it was about, or what the title meant, you'd have to google it. Furiosa, likewise, was sold as little more than Fury Road again but with new actors, with the trailers doing little to demonstrate how immensely different it is in structure. Furiosa is an epic tale that takes place over 18 years--it's the Godfather Part 2 of Mad Max, basically, but the ads hid everything that made it different from the last one. > > The core issue, really, is how cookie cutter the Hollywood marketing machine has gotten--just about every big trailer is cut similarly to these ones I'm complaining about. But it's fine when they actually give us information, or are able to come somewhat close to matching the vibe of the movie. That's certainly a factor in how Denis Villeneuve's Dune flicks have managed to become hits, with Part Two reigning as the top movie of 2024 so far--the trailers for both Dune movies generally reflect the vibe of the films they are selling, and they use narration to fill you in on the various conflicts in the story so you can get a sense of what's going on without reading any books. In other words, those trailers come off subconsciously to viewers as sincere and trustworthy. > > And by extension, the trailers for The Fall Guy and Furiosa, which seem to fear trying to sell those movies on their own actual merits, play instead as empty and meaningless and not really worth caring about. Hollywood's been churning out trailers like this, which coast entirely on vibes at the expense of telling you what the movie is about, non-stop for about a decade--we may just be over it at this point.

    Previously: Are trailers revealing too much again nowadays?

    47
    British Films @feddit.uk ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝 @feddit.uk

    Vue Cinemas UK move into distribution after Hollywood strikes limit film supply

    cross-posted from: https://reddthat.com/post/20727695

    > Paywalled link: https://www.ft.com/content/bdc1e3d1-c2f2-499d-a488-9186b0e9fcca

    > Europe’s largest privately owned cinema operator Vue International is moving into film distribution following a lack of supply after the Hollywood strikes. > > The company set up a distribution arm in the UK last month with the goal of rolling out British, foreign and independent films on its own screens and those of rivals. Vue also announced during the Cannes Film Festival last month that it would team up with UK producers Andy Paterson and Annalise Davis, and virtual production company Dimension Studio, in a project to distribute films they produce. “Because of the Hollywood strikes, we are suffering this year with a number of movies, [as] we have a supply issue,” chief executive Tim Richards told the Financial Times. “As a consequence, we thought it was a very opportune time to start bringing our own movies in.” > > He added that Vue would eventually expand its distribution business to continental Europe and that it was hiring for the business. > > Moving into distribution is a relatively unusual move for a cinema chain, but the new arm will allow Vue to gain greater control of films after a period of limited supply.

    0

    UK polls point to 'electoral extinction' for Prime Minister Sunak's Conservatives

    > Three British opinion polls released late on Saturday presented a grim picture for Prime Minister Rishi Sunak's Conservative Party, and one pollster warned that the party faced "electoral extinction" in July 4's election. > > The polls come just over halfway through the election campaign, after a week in which both the Conservatives and Labour set out their manifestos, and shortly before voters begin to receive postal ballots. > > ... > > Market research company Savanta found 46% support for Keir Starmer's Labour Party, up 2 points on the previous poll five days earlier, while support for the Conservatives dropped 4 points to 21%. The poll was conducted from June 12 to June 14 for the Sunday Telegraph. > > Labour's 25-point lead was the largest since the premiership of Sunak's predecessor, Liz Truss, whose tax cut plans prompted investors to dump British government bonds, pushing up interest rates and forcing a Bank of England intervention. "Our research suggests that this election could be nothing short of electoral extinction for the Conservative Party," Chris Hopkins, political research director at Savanta, said. > > A separate poll by Survation, published by the Sunday Times, predicted the Conservatives could end up with just 72 seats in the 650-member House of Commons - the lowest in their nearly 200-year history - while Labour would win 456 seats. > > The poll was conducted from May 31 to June 13. In percentage terms, the Survation poll had Labour on 40% and the Conservatives on 24%, while former Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage's Reform UK party - a right-wing challenger to the Conservatives - was on 12%. > > A third poll, by Opinium for Sunday's Observer, and conducted from June 12 to June 14, also showed Labour on 40%, the Conservatives on 23% and Reform on 14%, with the two largest parties yielding ground to smaller rivals.

    17
    www.theguardian.com Strike: An Uncivil War review – brutal confrontation on the miners’ strike picket lines

    Former miners and police officers recall Orgreave, one of the nastiest events in postwar British history, in Daniel Gordon’s forthright documentary

    cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/13421223

    > > British schoolchildren are taught that the last full-scale military engagement on their soil was the battle of Culloden in 1746. But this should change: on 18 June 1984 the battle of Orgreave, the subject of Daniel Gordon’s documentary, was the bitterest moment of the miners’ strike of 1984-85. It was the last stand for both sides, a brutal and chaotic confrontation of about 5,000 pickets determined not to let trucks get through to pick up coke for the Scunthorpe steelworks, versus about 6,000 police officers, some mounted, and armed with new shields and batons. > > > > The police were effectively directed by Downing Street, which was determined that the force should not be overwhelmed by force of numbers as they had been during a comparable situation in the 1972 miners’ strike. A paramilitary strategy developed to suppress colonial disorder was deployed, laid out in a strategy document never shown to parliament. > > > > ... > > > > Gordon speaks to pickets who are still clearly traumatised by the events of Orgreave and by the strike in general. Perhaps therapy has never been on the cards for men of that generation and it could actually be that this film has been the first time that they have ever really spoken or thought deeply about the strike and its long term emotional effects. What emerges is the enduring bitterness that some felt towards those who returned to work; I flinched when one miner tells Gordon that his union-stalwart dad never forgave him for going back. When a reporter at the time asked whether he wouldn’t mind his son going to his funeral, he replies: “I’d rather go to his.” > > > > Police officers recount being instructed by their seniors to fabricate witness statements. BBC reporter Nick Jones is interviewed, rueful about the way things went down. No Tories appear on camera, though, Sir John Redwood, who was director of No 10’s policy unit during the strike, is thanked in the credits. > > > > This is a tough, valuable, forthright film about one of the nastiest, ugliest moments in postwar British history. Since 1985, the debate about fossil fuels has, of course, changed. But it is still staggering that a government planned wholesale mine closures with no thought for and no interest in what would happen to the communities affected. > > > > • Strike: An Uncivil War screened at the Sheffield documentary festival on 16 June, and is in UK and Irish cinemas from 21 June.

    0
    Emperor ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝 @feddit.uk

    A geologist and archaeologist by training, a nerd by inclination - books, films, fossils, comics, rocks, games, folklore, and, generally, the rum and uncanny... Let's have it!

    Elsewhere:

    • Yrtree.me - it's still early days for me in the Fediverse, so bear with me
    Posts 2.4K
    Comments 4.5K