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Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure

proton.me Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure | Proton

To ensure our mission always comes first, Proton is transitioning to a non-profit structure and formalizing our promise of people before profits.

Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure | Proton
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Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure

proton.me Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure | Proton

To ensure our mission always comes first, Proton is transitioning to a non-profit structure and formalizing our promise of people before profits.

Proton is transitioning towards a non-profit structure | Proton
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iOS 18 now allows users to selectively share specific contacts with apps, rather than granting full or no access to all contacts as in previous versions

techcrunch.com iOS 18 cracks down on apps asking for full address book access | TechCrunch

To give users more control over the contacts an app can and cannot access, the permissions screen has two stages.

iOS 18 cracks down on apps asking for full address book access | TechCrunch

>iOS apps that build their own social networks on the back of users’ address books may soon become a thing of the past. In iOS 18, Apple is cracking down on the social apps that ask users’ permission to access their contacts — something social apps often do to connect users with their friends or make suggestions for who to follow. Now, Apple is adding a new two-step permissions pop-up screen that will first ask users to allow or deny access to their contacts, as before, and then, if the user allows access, will allow them to choose which contacts they want to share, if not all.

>For those interested in security and privacy, the addition is welcome. As security firm Mysk wrote on X, the change would be “sad news for data harvesting apps…” Others pointed out that this would hopefully prevent apps that ask repeatedly for address book access even after they had been denied. Now users could grant them access but limit which contacts they could actually ingest.

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Microsoft Chose Profit Over Security and Left U.S. Government Vulnerable to Russian Hack, Whistleblower Says | ProPublica Investigation

www.propublica.org Whistleblower Says Microsoft Dismissed Warnings About a Security Flaw That Russians Later Used to Hack U.S. Government

Former employee says software giant dismissed his warnings about a critical flaw because it feared losing government business. Russian hackers later used the weakness to breach the National Nuclear Security Administration, among others.

Whistleblower Says Microsoft Dismissed Warnings About a Security Flaw That Russians Later Used to Hack U.S. Government

>Former employee says software giant dismissed his warnings about a critical flaw because it feared losing government business. Russian hackers later used the weakness to breach the National Nuclear Security Administration, among others.

>The federal government was preparing to make a massive investment in cloud computing, and Microsoft wanted the business. Acknowledging this security flaw could jeopardize the company’s chances, Harris recalled one product leader telling him. The financial consequences were enormous. Not only could Microsoft lose a multibillion-dollar deal, but it could also lose the race to dominate the market for cloud computing.

>Harris said he pleaded with the company for several years to address the flaw in the product, a ProPublica investigation has found. But at every turn, Microsoft dismissed his warnings

>his fears became reality. U.S. officials confirmed reports that a state-sponsored team of Russian hackers had carried out SolarWinds, one of the largest cyberattacks in U.S. history. They used the flaw Harris had identified to vacuum up sensitive data from a number of federal agencies, including, ProPublica has learned, the National Nuclear Security Administration, which maintains the United States’ nuclear weapons stockpile, and the National Institutes of Health, which at the time was engaged in COVID-19 research and vaccine distribution. The Russians also used the weakness to compromise dozens of email accounts in the Treasury Department, including those of its highest-ranking officials. One federal official described the breach as “an espionage campaign designed for long-term intelligence collection.”

>Harris’ account, told here for the first time and supported by interviews with former colleagues and associates as well as social media posts, upends the prevailing public understanding of the SolarWinds hack.

> the board’s report identified a “corporate culture that deprioritized both enterprise security investments and rigorous risk management.”

>ProPublica’s investigation adds new details and pivotal context about that culture, offering an unsettling look into how the world’s largest software provider handles the security of its own ubiquitous products. It also offers crucial insight into just how much the quest for profits can drive those security decisions, especially as tech behemoths push to dominate the newest — and most lucrative — frontiers, including the cloud market.

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apnews.com Boeing sales tumble as the company gets no orders for the 737 Max for the second straight month

Boeing had another weak month for aircraft sales in May, taking orders for just four new planes. The company said Tuesday that it got no new orders for its best-selling jet, the 737 Max.

Boeing sales tumble as the company gets no orders for the 737 Max for the second straight month
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www.macrumors.com iOS 18 and macOS Sequoia Add 'Rotate Wi-Fi Address' Option to Cut Down on Tracking

With iOS 18, iPadOS 18, and macOS Sequoia, Apple has replaced the Private Wi-Fi Address option for Wi-Fi networks with a new Rotate Wi-Fi Address...

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arstechnica.com Adobe to update vague AI terms after users threaten to cancel subscriptions

Adobe scrambles to earn back user trust by updating terms next week.

Adobe to update vague AI terms after users threaten to cancel subscriptions

>Adobe has promised to update its terms of service to make it "abundantly clear" that the company will "never" train generative AI on creators' content after days of customer backlash, with some saying they would cancel Adobe subscriptions over its vague terms. > >Users got upset last week when an Adobe pop-up informed them of updates to terms of use that seemed to give Adobe broad permissions to access user content, take ownership of that content, or train AI on that content. The pop-up forced users to agree to these terms to access Adobe apps, disrupting access to creatives' projects unless they immediately accepted them. > >For any users unwilling to accept, canceling annual plans could trigger fees amounting to 50 percent of their remaining subscription cost. Adobe justifies collecting these fees because a "yearly subscription comes with a significant discount."

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All three game console makers, Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony, have now abandoned X (formerly Twitter) integration
  • Summary:

    • Nintendo has discontinued support for X (formerly Twitter) integration on the Nintendo Switch console.
    • The reason for pulling support is likely due to pricing changes to the X API, which now starts at $42,000 a month for enterprise customers.
    • Microsoft and Sony also removed X integration from their consoles (Xbox and PS5/PS4) last year, but didn't specify the reason.
    • Slack, a communication platform, also pulled support for X integration due to the API updates impacting its functionality.
    • Console gamers will no longer be able to connect directly with X, despite the X Gaming account claiming that its "partnership with Nintendo remains strong" in a now-deleted post.
  • Apple is bringing RCS to the iPhone in iOS 18 | The new standard will replace SMS as the default communication protocol between Android and iOS devices

    >The long-awaited day is here: Apple has announced that its Messages app will support RCS in iOS 18. The move comes after years of taunting, cajoling, and finally, some regulatory scrutiny from the EU.

    >Right now, when people on iOS and Android message each other, the service falls back to SMS — photos and videos are sent at a lower quality, messages are shortened, and importantly, conversations are not end-to-end encrypted like they are in iMessage. Messages from Android phones show up as green bubbles in iMessage chats and chaos ensues.

    >Apple’s announcement was likely an effort to appease EU regulators.

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    Meta to use Instagram and Facebook posts from as far back as 2007 to train artificial intelligence tools
  • Summary:

    • Meta (Facebook and Instagram's parent company) will start using Australians' social media posts and activity dating back to 2007 to train their artificial intelligence (AI) tools.
    • This policy update will take effect on June 26, 2024.
    • Only users in the European Union and the U.S. state of Illinois can currently opt out, due to AI protection laws like the GDPR.
    • Many Australians were unaware of this policy change and expressed concerns about privacy and the impact on artists' livelihoods.
    • Artists like Sara Fandrey and Thomas Fitzpatrick are worried this will negatively impact their work and the creative industry.
    • Experts explain that while this may not be copyright infringement, it poses a threat to artists' economic assets and business models.
    • Advocacy groups have launched complaints against Meta in the EU, and some users are migrating to alternative, artist-run social platforms like Cara to avoid AI-powered content generation.
  • Meta to use Instagram and Facebook posts from as far back as 2007 to train artificial intelligence tools

    www.abc.net.au 'Feels a bit like an invasion of privacy': Australians react to Meta's plans to use posts to train AI

    If you're among the majority of Australians with Facebook or Instagram accounts, your social activity on those platforms is about to start training Meta's artificial intelligence (AI) tools — and if you live in Australia, you can't say no.

    'Feels a bit like an invasion of privacy': Australians react to Meta's plans to use posts to train AI
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    Some company heads hoped return-to-office mandates would make people quit, survey says
  • Summary:

    • A survey by BambooHR found that some US companies implemented return-to-office (RTO) policies in the hopes of getting workers to quit.
    • 52% of respondents prefer working remotely, while 39% prefer working in an office.
    • 37% of managers believe their organization enacted layoffs because fewer employees than expected quit during RTO.
    • 25% of VP and C-suite executives and 18% of HR professionals admit they hoped for some voluntary turnover during RTO.
    • 22% of HR professionals said their company has no metrics for measuring a successful RTO.
    • 28% of remote workers fear they will be laid off before those working in the office.
    • 45% of people surveyed whose companies have RTO policies said they lost valued workers.
    • 28% said they would consider leaving their jobs if their employer enacted an RTO mandate.
    • The survey found that remote and in-office employees spend an equal amount of time working (76% of a 9-to-5 shift).
    • In-office workers spend around one hour more socializing than remote workers, while remote workers spend that time on work-related tasks.
    • 32% of managers said one of the main goals of their firm implementing an in-office policy was to track employee working habits.
    • 48% of respondents said their work results have improved since returning to the office, and 58% said they have a stronger professional network.
  • >Nearly two in five (37 percent) managers, directors, and executives believe their organization enacted layoffs in the last year because fewer employees than they expected quit during their RTO. And their beliefs are well-founded: One in four (25 percent) VP and C-suite executives and one in five (18 percent) HR pros admit they hoped for some voluntary turnover during an RTO.

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    Spotify has raised prices for the second time in a year, with no new benefits, after its CEO sparked outrage by claiming the cost of creating 'content' is 'close to zero'
  • Related:

    The platform does not pay according to a per-stream rate, but rather puts all the revenue from subscribers and ads into a giant pot, and divides that share according to their respective "streamshare." Under this model, artists are estimated to receive between $0.003 to $0.005 per play.

    That's about to change. Beginning early next year, Spotify will only pay royalties to artists whose tracks have been streamed 1,000 times in the past 12 months, effectively locking out the smallest artists from the "streamshare" pot. The money that would have been paid out to these small artists — which Spotify said amounts to $40 million a year — will instead go to "those most dependent on streaming revenue."

    According to Spotify, artists generally don't pocket the earnings from tracks that have under 1,000 streams anyway, because they don't meet the labels and distributors' minimum withdrawal amount. The company also says it does not make any additional money under the new model. But musicians have said they feel the model is “putting a number on art," and industry experts said that this change essentially makes Spotify the arbiter of which artist is deserving of payment.

    There has to be a way for multibillion-dollar companies to both keep music accessible and appropriately compensate musicians — especially fledgling, independent ones.

    Spotify will stop paying anything at all for roughly two-thirds of tracks on the platform. That is any track receiving fewer than 1,000 streams over the period of a year. Tracks falling under this arbitrary minimum will continue to accrue royalties – but those royalties will now be redirected upwards, often to bigger artists, rather than to their own rights holders.

    This sounds incredible, but there’s nothing to stop it. And their primary business partners – the three major labels – are cheering the change on because it will mean more money in their pockets.

  • Spotify has raised prices for the second time in a year, with no new benefits, after its CEO sparked outrage by claiming the cost of creating 'content' is 'close to zero'
  • Summary:

    • Spotify has announced another price hike for its subscription plans in the United States.
    • This price increase comes shortly after Spotify CEO Daniel Ek sparked outrage among music fans and creators by claiming that the "cost of creating content is close to zero."
    • Many musicians and music fans condemned Ek's comments, arguing that music is not just "content" and that it is costly and time-consuming to create.
    • Despite the backlash, Spotify is increasing its standard Premium plan by $1 to $11.99, the Duo plan by $2 to $16.99, and the Family plan by $3 to $19.99 per month.
    • Spotify claims the price hikes are necessary to invest in and innovate its product features, but this reasoning is questioned given Ek's "content" cost comments.
    • Spotify is less vulnerable to customer churn compared to TV/movie streaming services, as users are less likely to switch music streaming providers due to the hassle of rebuilding playlists and losing personalized recommendations.
  • Microsoft has blocked the bypass that allowed you to create a local account during Windows 11 setup by typing in a blocked email address
  • Summary:

    In the past, you could bypass the sign-in requirement by choosing ‘Offline Account’ or ‘Sign in with a local account instead.' However, Microsoft removed this option in recent years, meaning you would need an active internet connection to create a Microsoft account for a new Windows 11 install.

    Some users discovered that they could bypass this requirement by using the following blocked email addresses: example@example.com, a@a.com, or no@thankyou.com, and then typing in a random password. While this would let you fall back to proceeding with an offline account until recently, it now results in an ‘Oops, something went wrong’ message, which will return you to the same email input screen.

    Thankfully, there remains another way to install Windows 11 without a Microsoft account. When you’re at the log-in screen, you can hit Shift + F10 and type OOBE/BYPASSNRO, which will let you create a local account instead if you do not have an internet connection (so disconnect the internet for this). However, non-tech-savvy users will likely not know this, so many would likely end up creating another unwanted online account.

    This is just one of the controversial steps Microsoft has recently been taking, like including ads in the Start Menu, nagging Windows 10 users to upgrade, or adding a watermark if your PC does not support AI features.

  • Instagram is testing unskippable "Ad Breaks" lasting 3-5 seconds, disrupting user browsing experience
  • Alternative to Instagram:

    • Pixelfed (Ad-free, privacy friendly, open source and decentralized)

    Wikipedia:

    Pixelfed is a free and open-source image sharing social network service. The platform distinguishes itself from other image sharing services through its decentralized architecture, meaning user data is not stored on a central server. It uses the ActivityPub protocol, allowing users to interact with other social networks within the protocol, such as Mastodon, PeerTube, and Friendica. Pixelfed and other platforms utilizing this protocol are considered to be part of the Fediverse. The network is made up of several independent sites that communicate with one another, which is roughly comparable to e-mail providers. The parties involved do not all have to be registered with the same provider, but can still communicate with each other. Thus, users are able to sign up on any server and follow others on the other instances.

    Much like Mastodon, Pixelfed implements chronological timelines without content manipulation algorithms. It also aims to be privacy-focused with no third party analytics or tracking. Pixelfed optionally organizes its media by hashtags, geo-tagging and likes based on each server. It also allows audiences to be distinguished in three ways and on a post-by-post basis: followers-only, public, and unlisted. Like several other social platforms, Pixelfed allows accounts to be locked, when followers must be pre-approved by the owner.

  • Google's "Manifest V2" Chrome extension phaseout next month is expected to impact the original uBlock Origin extension, which still uses the V2 framework and has 37 million users
  • For those looking to move beyond Chrome, there are alternatives that come pre-installed with uBlock Origin and are considered better than Firefox:

    This project is a custom and independent version of Firefox, with the primary goals of privacy, security and user freedom.

    LibreWolf is designed to increase protection against tracking and fingerprinting techniques, while also including a few security improvements. This is achieved through our privacy and security oriented settings and patches. LibreWolf also aims to remove all the telemetry, data collection and annoyances, as well as disabling anti-freedom features like DRM.

    The Mullvad Browser is developed – in collaboration between Mullvad VPN and the Tor Project – to minimize tracking and fingerprinting. It is designed to be used with a trustworthy VPN instead of the Tor Network. It does not require the use of Mullvad's VPN.

  • Google's "Manifest V2" Chrome extension phaseout next month is expected to impact the original uBlock Origin extension, which still uses the V2 framework and has 37 million users

    www.theregister.com Google prepares for Chrome extension Manifest V2 phase out

    Starting Monday, users will gradually be warned the end is near

    Google prepares for Chrome extension Manifest V2 phase out

    >The new MV3 architecture reflects Google's avowed desire to make browser extensions more performant, private, and secure. But the internet giant's attempt to do so has been bitterly contested by makers of privacy-protecting and content-blocking extensions, who have argued that the Chocolate Factory's new software architecture will lead to less effective privacy and content-filtering extensions.

    >For users of uBlock Origin, which runs on Manifest V2, "options" means using the less capable uBlock Origin Lite, which supports Manifest V3.

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    Internet Archive is continuing to face DDoS attacks after several days, says “this attack has been sustained, impactful, targeted, adaptive, and importantly, mean”
  • For more than two and a half decades, we have collected, preserved, and shared our digital cultural artifacts. Thanks to the generosity of our patrons, the Internet Archive has grown from a small preservation project into a vast library that serves millions of people each year. Our work has impacted the lives of so many of our users who value free and open access to information.

    From the beginning, it was important for the Internet Archive to be a nonprofit, because it was working for the people. Its motives had to be transparent; it had to last a long time. That's why we don't charge for access, sell user data, or run ads, even while we offer free resources to citizens everywhere. We rely on the generosity of individuals like you to pay for servers, staff, and preservation projects.

    If you can't imagine a future without the Internet Archive, please consider supporting our work. We promise to put your donation to good use as we continue to store over 99 petabytes of data, including 625 billion webpages, 38 million books and texts, and 14 million audio recordings.

  • Internet Archive is continuing to face DDoS attacks after several days, says “this attack has been sustained, impactful, targeted, adaptive, and importantly, mean”
  • Internet Archive is also being sued by the US book publishing and US recording industries associations, which are claiming copyright infringement and demanding combined damages of hundreds of millions of dollars and diminished services from all libraries.

    “If our patrons around the globe think this latest situation is upsetting, then they should be very worried about what the publishing and recording industries have in mind,” added Kahle. “I think they are trying to destroy this library entirely and hobble all libraries everywhere. But just as we’re resisting the DDoS attack, we appreciate all the support in pushing back on this unjust litigation against our library and others.”

  • Internet Archive is continuing to face DDoS attacks after several days, says “this attack has been sustained, impactful, targeted, adaptive, and importantly, mean”
  • Summary:

    • Internet Archive, including its Wayback Machine, has been facing sustained DDoS attacks for several days
    • The attacks began on Sunday and have been intermittent, but disruptive to the organization's services
    • Internet Archive says the attacks have been "sustained, impactful, targeted, adaptive, and mean"
    • Despite the attacks, the organization's collections are safe, though access has been inconsistent
    • This comes as Internet Archive is also embroiled in a legal battle with US book publishers over its Controlled Digital Lending program
    • The non-profit is working to harden its defenses to offer more reliable access to its digital library
    • Cyberattacks have been increasingly targeting libraries and other knowledge institutions recently
  • InitialsDiceBearhttps://github.com/dicebear/dicebearhttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/„Initials” (https://github.com/dicebear/dicebear) by „DiceBear”, licensed under „CC0 1.0” (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)FO
    ForgottenFlux @lemmy.world

    Voluntarily sharing informative posts from unaffiliated sources.

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