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sahanjournal.com Minneapolis teachers, support staff, to hold strike vote

Minneapolis Public Schools teachers and support staff will hold strike votes this week after failing to reach agreement with the district in mediation.

The union said that members would vote on Thursday and Friday, and they would announce the results on Saturday. The unions can call a strike at any time after members approve, but are required to give the district 10 days’ notice before walking off the job.

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phys.org Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period

The emergence in the Neolithic of patrilineal social systems, in which children are affiliated with their father's lineage, may explain a spectacular decline in the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome observed worldwide between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago.

The emergence in the Neolithic of patrilineal social systems, in which children are affiliated with their father's lineage, may explain a spectacular decline in the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome observed worldwide between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago.

In a study published today in Nature Communications, a team of scientists from the CNRS, MNHN and Université Paris Cité suggest that these patrilineal organizations had a greater impact on the Y chromosome than mortality during conflict.

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m.startribune.com Italy halts loans to Minneapolis Institute of Art following dispute over 'Doryphoros' sculpture

In 2022, the Italian court demanded Mia return the ancient sculpture. Mia did not comply.

Italy's Culture Ministry officially has suspended art loans to the Minneapolis Institute of Art following disputes over the 1st century Roman sculpture "Doryphoros."

Italian authorities believe the statue, which originated in the south of Naples, was illegally excavated in the 1970s. Mia said it purchased it for $2.5 million in 1986 from art dealer Elie Borowski.

Italy first requested return of the statue in March 2022, after an Italian court ruled that Mia needed to give back the ancient sculpture that had long been displayed in the museum's second-floor rotunda near the Target Wing. The "Doryphoros" is one of a number of Roman copies based on original works by the Greek sculptor Polykleitos, and the one that Mia owns, made in the 1st century B.C.E., is one of the best preserved.

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MPCA to test entirety of Mississippi River this year

minnesotareformer.com MPCA to test entirety of Mississippi River this year • Minnesota Reformer

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency will be testing water quality along the entirety of the Mississippi River within the state’s borders in 2024, the agency announced this week. The MPCA typically only tests portions of the river in any given year, and this year’s effort to sample over 50 locatio

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency will be testing water quality along the entirety of the Mississippi River within the state’s borders in 2024, the agency announced this week.

The MPCA typically only tests portions of the river in any given year, and this year’s effort to sample over 50 locations from Bemidji to the Iowa border represents a first for the agency in what could be read as increasing concern about emerging threats to water quality, including 3M-manufactured chemical compounds known as PFAS.

Water quality within Minnesota’s stretch of the river has improved dramatically over the past four decades, according to a fact sheet from the Metropolitan Council. But levels of some contaminants — including nitrogen from excessive fertilizer use and chloride from road salt — are rising.

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www.mprnews.org Walz appoints Theodora Gaïtas and Sarah Hennesy to Minnesota Supreme Court

Gov. Tim Walz on Monday announced the appointment of two new Supreme Court justices — Theodora Gaïtas and Sarah Hennesy — who are set to replace retiring justices Margaret H. Chutich and G. Barry Anderson.

Walz announced the appointments of Theodora Gaïtas and Sarah Hennesy — both judges on lower courts — to replace retiring justices Margaret H. Chutich and G. Barry Anderson.

The appointments will again give the court a female majority. And all seven members will have been selected by DFL governors. Hennesy is set to replace Anderson, who will retire on May 10. Gaïtas will replace Chutich, who is set to retire at the end of July.

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www.livescience.com The tiny super-predator that howls at the moon before it kills

The southern grasshopper mouse is largely immune to the venom of the Arizona bark scorpion and will resort to cannibalism when times are tough.

One of its favorite prey is the Arizona bark scorpion (Centruroides sculpturatus) — whose venom is potent enough to kill humans.

To get around this, the southern grasshopper mouse reduces the venom's effects by shutting down the chemical channel that transmits the pain signal to the brain when that particular venom is present. This means they are essentially numb to the pain — although researchers still don't know why the toxin isn't lethal to them.

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m.startribune.com Six newspapers serving southwest Twin Cities metro area will publish last issue this week

The Shakopee Valley News, Prior Lake American, Jordan Independent, Chaska Herald, Chanhassen Villager and Savage Pacer will cease operations this week, and the Southwest News Media website will go dark. The publications are part of MediaNews Group, owned by Alden Global Capital.

The publications are part of Denver-based MediaNews Group, which is owned by Alden Global Capital, a hedge fund that purchased the group of papers in 2020. The company, one of the largest newspaper publishers in the country, is known for gutting and then closing local papers. It has published the St. Paul Pioneer Press since 2012.

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phys.org Five things our research uncovered when we recreated 16th century beer (and barrels)

It's true that our 16th-century ancestors drank much more than Irish people do today. But why they did so and what their beer was like are questions shrouded in myth. The authors were part of a team who set out to find some answers.

It's true that our 16th-century ancestors drank much more than Irish people do today. But why they did so and what their beer was like are questions shrouded in myth. The authors were part of a team who set out to find some answers.

As part of a major study of food and drink in early modern Ireland, funded by the European Research Council, we recreated and analyzed a beer last brewed at Dublin Castle in 1574. Combining craft, microbiology, brewing science, archaeology, as well as history, this was the most comprehensive interdisciplinary study of historical beer ever undertaken. Here are five things that we discovered.

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m.startribune.com Conservatives in Otter Tail County have been fighting for years, with no end in sight

A recent flare-up over precinct caucuses is the latest in a string of battles between local party officials and a group of grassroots activists.

In deep-red western Minnesota, a group of conservative activists have spent years crusading against their main political foe — other Republicans.

Calling themselves the Otter Tail County Grassroots, the activists have consistently clashed with the local party over endorsements, alleging fraud when one of their preferred candidates lost and casting protest votes against GOP nominees. The bitter feud escalated earlier this year when the grassroots activists took over the Otter Tail GOP party's precinct caucuses that drew hundreds of people in two cities, kicking out the people who led the proceedings so they could run things their own way and pick delegates who will endorse candidates.

This month, they defied the party again by hosting their own unsanctioned political convention.

The state Republican Party has had to step in and act as a referee, further angering activists who have enlisted GOP legislators from the region and beyond to aid their cause.

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Minnesota House approves bill that would speed licensing of marijuana dispensaries

sahanjournal.com Minn. House OKs bill that would speed licensing of dispensaries

Backers say cannabis dispensary license preapprovals would allow them to take steps to get up and running more quickly.

The Minnesota House voted Thursday to speed up the process for getting cannabis dispensaries lined up by giving them a route to preapproval of operating licenses.

On a 69-62 vote, lawmakers voted to allow the office to start issuing license preapprovals as early as this summer. Supporters say that would allow them to secure funding, rent real estate and take other steps to get up and running. They still wouldn’t be allowed to commercially grow or sell the marijuana itself.

“A number of provisions in this bill are designed to expedite the process of setting up a good legitimate marketplace for cannabis to displace that illicit marketplace that’s out there,” said the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Zack Stephenson, DFL-Coon Rapids.

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mndaily.com Three historical African American locations named to Minneapolis National Registry

The grant money will be used to create a study helping guide historic preservation in Minneapolis along with the nomination of at least three sites on the National Register.

The grant money will be used to create a study helping guide historic preservation in Minneapolis along with the nomination of at least three sites on the National Register.

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theconversation.com Native American voices are finally factoring into energy projects – a hydropower ruling is a victory for environmental justice on tribal lands

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission recently ruled that it won’t approve energy projects on Native lands without tribal consent. But many more applications are pending.

The U.S. has a long record of extracting resources on Native lands and ignoring tribal opposition, but a decision by federal energy regulators to deny permits for seven proposed hydropower projects suggests that tide may be turning.

As the U.S. shifts from fossil fuels to clean energy, developers are looking for sites to generate electricity from renewable sources. But in an unexpected move, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied permits on Feb. 15, 2024, for seven proposed hydropower projects in Arizona and New Mexico.

The reason: These projects were located within the Navajo Nation and were proposed without first consulting with the tribe. FERC said it was “establishing a new policy that the Commission will not issue preliminary permits for projects proposing to use Tribal lands if the Tribe on whose lands the project is to be located opposes the permit.”

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sahanjournal.com Anoka-Hennepin school board member threatens budget over equity efforts

Matt Audette, a conservative Anoka-Hennepin school board member, threatened a budget showdown over the north metro district’s diversity efforts and curriculum.

An Anoka-Hennepin school board member backed by a conservative parents rights group says he plans to force a budget showdown if the district does not scrap programs aimed at racial and gender equity.

Matt Audette wrote in an April 12 Facebook post that he would not vote for any budget that included the “spreading of divisive, one-sided views.”

But officials at the north metro school district say many of these programs are required by law, and eliminating them could imperil the district’s funding and students’ ability to graduate.

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www.nature.com Humans and their livestock have sheltered in this cave for 10,000 years

Saudi Arabian herders have travelled the same routes for millennia, cave discovery suggests.

The researchers turned to caves under Harrat Khaybar, a vast basalt plain pocked with volcanic craters in northwestern Saudi Arabia. The caves were made by lava as it flowed from nearby volcanoes, forming rocky tunnels as it cooled.

An excavation near the entrance of one cave produced more than 600 animal and human bones and 44 stone-tool fragments. The oldest stone tools dated back to as many as 10,000 years ago, and the oldest human bone fragments were almost 7,000 years old. The study was published on 17 April in PLoS ONE1.

The distribution of samples suggests that people did not live in the cave for long periods, but stayed there occasionally. Nearby rock art depicts people with goats and sheep. The drawings are difficult to date, but they support the fossil evidence that people used the cave as a place to rest and shelter their herds. Even today, farmers seek shade and water in underground lava tubes for themselves and their animals, says Stewart.

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Histomap: Visualizing the 4,000 Year History of Global Power
  • Hey, we had one of those on the wall at home when I was a kid!

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  • www.mprnews.org Minnesota says 4-year graduation rates slipped, but that’s not the case

    The Minnesota Department of Education last month reported graduation rates dipped in 2023, renewing concerns around the state’s public schools. But a closer look at the data finds graduation rates are actually climbing. Here’s what happened.

    The Minnesota Department of Education in March reported four-year graduation rates were down in 2023, renewing concerns about the direction of the state’s public schools and the lingering effects of the pandemic.

    But a deeper look at the data finds the state’s published results were flawed and that graduation rates are actually rising.

    APM Research Lab, a sister organization of MPR News with expertise in collecting and analyzing public data, examined the results. It found after incorporating misreported numbers from several school systems, including Minneapolis and St. Paul, two of the state’s largest districts, the state graduation rate rose slightly, from 83.6 in 2022 to 83.8 percent.

    It’s a slight but important change at a time when school performance data is scrutinized intensely. From test scores to graduation rates, those numbers have an outsized influence on policy decisions and on public perceptions of school success and failure.

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    Simpsons across the globe
  • No Maggie, not Aztec, Olmec.

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    Favorite zombie moments in film and television?
  • The lawnmower scene in Dead Alive?

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    Even Minnesota isn't safe from earthquakes
  • Browns Valley better watch out

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  • Companies are evading Minnesota's interest rate caps. Lawmakers may leave the loophole open.

    minnesotareformer.com Companies are evading Minnesota's interest rate caps. Lawmakers may leave the loophole open. • Minnesota Reformer

    Minnesota lawmakers imposed strong limits on payday lenders last session, capping interest rates at 33% for loans between $350 and $1,000, and even lower for smaller loans — but a federal law allows banks based in other states to offer short-term loans with triple-digit interest rates. A bill in the

    Minnesota lawmakers imposed strong limits on payday lenders last session, capping interest rates at 33% for loans between $350 and $1,000, and even lower for smaller loans — but a federal law allows banks based in other states to offer short-term loans with triple-digit interest rates.

    A bill in the Legislature could close the loophole by opting Minnesota out of a provision in federal law that allows state-chartered, federally insured banks to offer loans at the interest rates allowed in their home state, rather than the state where the loan is issued.

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    sahanjournal.com Minneapolis foundry under fire for air pollution also failed to protect employees from hazardous chemicals

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration fined Smith Foundry $15,300 for failing to protect workers from breathing hazards.

    A south Minneapolis iron foundry that repeatedly violated federal law with its air pollution also failed to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals, according to a federal inspection.

    The Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) found that Smith foundry improperly exposed employees to carbon monoxide and respirable crystalline silica, and didn’t provide them with the proper protective equipment or training to mitigate such exposure, according to a news release from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA).

    Smith Foundry, which is currently under an enforcement process with the Environmental Protection Agency for violating the federal Clean Air Act, also didn’t provide employees with baseline medical examinations “within 30 days of assignment.” It also failed to provide new employees with proper respiration and mitigation training, according to the MPCA.

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    www.livescience.com Neolithic women in Europe were tied up and buried alive in ritual sacrifices, study suggests

    The research found evidence of the "incaprettamento" method of murder at 14 Neolithic sites in Europe.

    The murder of sacrificial victims by "incaprettamento" — tying their neck to their legs bent behind their back, so that they effectively strangled themselves — seems to have been a tradition across much of Neolithic Europe, with a new study identifying more than a dozen such murders over more than 2,000 years.

    The study comes after a reassessment of an ancient tomb that was discovered more than 20 years ago at Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux near Avignon, in southern France. The tomb mimics a silo, or pit where grain was stored, and it held the remains of three women who were buried there about 5,500 years ago.

    The new study, published Wednesday (April 10) in the journal Science Advances, reinterprets the positions of two of the skeletons and suggests the individuals were deliberately killed — first by tying them up in the manner called "incaprettamento" and then by burying them while they were still alive, perhaps for an agricultural ritual.

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    www.livescience.com Extremely rare marsupial mole that 'expertly navigates' sand dunes spotted in Western Australia

    Kanyirninpa Jukurrpa Martu rangers have photographed an elusive mole covered in silky golden locks that burrows in the sands of Western Australia and is only spotted a few times per decade.

    The tiny moles are covered in silky, golden fur and spend very little time above ground, although they do occasionally surface in wet and cool weather, according to Animal Diversity Web. But, the majority of the time, these tubular-shaped marsupials move through the sand up to 8.2 feet (2.5 meters) below the surface using their heads and excavator-like clawed hands.

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    Archaeologists Are Organizing to Dig Out of Poverty Wages
  • "meager benefits", I wish. I have a specialized degree and nearly 15 years of experience in CRM, and I have absolutely none. No vacation, no sick leave, no health insurance, no retirement, nada. And essentially no chance of that changing without going back to school to get a master's, and even then no guarantee. I hear legends from time to time of field techs trying to unionize back in the 90s and getting blacklisted, hopefully this time it takes off instead.

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    Looks like SEO chuds are now adding 'Reddit' to the titles.
  • You mean the ones where all the comments say [deleted]?

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    The Disney Plus password-sharing crackdown starts in June
  • So what if you travel, can you not stream from a hotel since it's a different IP address?

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    20 Essential Criterion Collection Films
  • Just watched Naked a few weeks back on the criterion channel. Can't believe I hadn't heard of it until now, an amazing movie.

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    On "World" vs. "Worldnews":
  • I always assumed the two communities were the result of some mod-drama/schism, if that's not the case, nuking one makes perfect sense to me. Unfortunately the lesser used and formerly mod-abandoned community has the better underlying name, but what can you do.

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    Kathy Cargill finally reveals her plan for Park Point and the reason she’s scrapping it
  • I believe that's the first time I've ever heard that expression before in my life, Kathy.

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    OLT Tax Service Experience
  • I've used them for years. Most years I have W-2s from multiple states, they're the only free e-file that covers all states (with income tax) last I checked (I think h&r block did briefly, but I don't think they even do free file anymore). They also do my state's renters rebate, which most other free file providers don't. I did have some issues several times with it switching me to only paid options at the very end, but a message to support always fixed it.

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    Minneapolis receives funds to document Black history and list historic places
  • My vote's for George Floyd Square. I have some experience with NRHP eligibility nominations, seems like it would be a shoe-in.

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    Sham 69 - If the Kids are United
  • Did it ever bother anybody else that "united" and "divided" don't really rhyme?

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    I'd love to hear everybody's pet peeves in movie and TV production.
  • Shaving. Every single time someone is shaving in any movie or show, they always make a few random strokes on one side of the face, maybe a little on the chin, and then they always stop halfway through. Gets my OCD up. Then to make thing worse, they always wipe up the rest of the shaving cream with a towel and casually toss the towel to the side. Covered in shaving cream. With a half-shaved face. Monsters.

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    Can witches fly? A historian unpacks the medieval invention − and skepticism − of the witch on a broomstick
  • Fourth paragraph from the end:

    Scholars have speculated that the ointments often mentioned in accounts of such flight might have functioned as hallucinogens, producing sensations of flying. The most thorough study of these accounts, however, finds that such references rarely appear in voluntary testimony. They come instead from authorities recording, and often reshaping, what accused witches said.

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    AMC Theaters suck
  • This is intentional, it's to give the edibles time to kick in.

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    Guess the Episode [Medium]
  • Flintstones chewable morphine!

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    Former funeral home owner arrested after a corpse lay in a hearse for 2 years
  • I'm imagining a movie based on these events, played out as a comedy of errors. Probably in too poor taste for the major studios.

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